Widevine DRM

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Comments

  • acatrusacatrus Posts: 352 ✭✭✭✭✭✭

    When they send update, all get one, so it's not tied to a specific IMEI. My question, can it be done that way, just like ZTE is pushing beta update to specific user.

    Maybe it's a bit of trouble for the company, programming each IMEI. It's probably mych simpler simply plug N play and update.

    I don't know how it work, just trying to figure if it can be done by other mean than physical.

  • ryampolskyryampolsky United StatesPosts: 231 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jimlloyd40 said:

    @ryampolsky said:
    "The Widevine keybox must be encrypted with a device-unique secret key that is not visible to software or probing methods outside of the TrustZone. The Widevine key-box must be installed in the factory or delivered to the device using an approved secure delivery mechanism."

    You would still be able to root a phone that has Widevine L1 certification.

    Yeah, the "device-unique" security key bit sounds like the delivered HD content is encrypted to be viewable on just that device - rendering copying useless. And it's the installation of that key that needs to be done from a trusted system. Sounds reasonable enough. I wonder why OP and ZTE didn't do this upfront - unless it's hard to automate and requires extra, expensive steps. Then again, ZTE got device encryption wrong at first too. I guess I'd give them a pass, since the A7 was their first attempt a a true flagship-class device.

  • stevec5375stevec5375 TexasPosts: 802 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @jimlloyd40 said:

    @ryampolsky said:

    @jimlloyd40 said:

    @ryampolsky said:
    "The Widevine keybox must be encrypted with a device-unique secret key that is not visible to software or probing methods outside of the TrustZone. The Widevine key-box must be installed in the factory or delivered to the device using an approved secure delivery mechanism."

    You would still be able to root a phone that has Widevine L1 certification.

    Yeah, the "device-unique" security key bit sounds like the delivered HD content is encrypted to be viewable on just that device - rendering copying useless. And it's the installation of that key that needs to be done from a trusted system. Sounds reasonable enough. I wonder why OP and ZTE didn't do this upfront - unless it's hard to automate and requires extra, expensive steps. Then again, ZTE got device encryption wrong at first too. I guess I'd give them a pass, since the A7 was their first attempt a a true flagship-class device.

    @ryampolsky I think that you're right. It was ZTE 's first flagship with regards to the specifications. But it's the little things or not so little things that make a true flagship such as the Widevine L1 certification and the Camera2 API. Metadata for Bluetooth etc. A company has to include all these things to compete with what we call a flagship phone. The Axon 7 was ZTE 's flagship but just not quite up to the standards of other flagships.** Nonetheless a great value though. **

    A great value? I value my sanity and next time around will be paying more and hopefully getting more.

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