Best camera settings for low-light, action shots?

marcwool1marcwool1 CanadaPosts: 117 ✭✭✭✭✭

I would like to take some good photos of my daughter going out for Halloween. It will be dark, and obviously a tripod is useless because none of the photos will be stationary.

Can anyone recommend some manual settings that will improve the Axon 7's low-light capabilities for action-shots?
Something that won't dramatically increase the blur effect?

Every time I use the phone's flash for night time photos, the subjects look too white and washed out.

Comments

  • alchromaalchroma Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited October 30, 2017 2:33AM

    Try the flash, but, move back and then zoom a little to get the framing right.
    This will reduce the harsh flash.
    Find the sweet spot. Know your camera.
    All the other options will give blur to some extent.

    Al

  • kidnovakidnova Posts: 435 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    The best option is probably bringing a different camera with you for the evening. I'm sorry, but the A7 just isn't going to produce good shots in low light regardless of the settings.

  • marcwool1marcwool1 CanadaPosts: 117 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've seen that video before and I was alluding to it being useless because I'm not about to lug a tripod around, and people in general, but kids specifically, are not going to hold a pose for more than 1 second.

    One day, if I feel like taking a stationary photo of my table, that video might be helpful.

    For now I'm thinking I'll have to use my daughter's phone for pictures once it gets dark.

  • marcwool1marcwool1 CanadaPosts: 117 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jimlloyd40 said:

    @marcwool1 said:
    I've seen that video before and I was alluding to it being useless because I'm not about to lug a tripod around, and people in general, but kids specifically, are not going to hold a pose for more than 1 second.

    One day, if I feel like taking a stationary photo of my table, that video might be helpful.

    For now I'm thinking I'll have to use my daughter's phone for pictures once it gets dark.

    Sorry I mentioned it.

    Ah, actually I appologise. Frustration got the better of me. A decent low-light camera is something you never figure you'll need and then it turns out you really need it.

    I ended up shooting pics simultaneously with my daughter's S7, and my Axon 7. The daylight and sunset photos, the Axon did a better job, but once night time kicked-in the S7 destroyed my Axon 7 for low-light with and without flash, photos.

  • razor512razor512 United StatesPosts: 2,639 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @marcwool1 said:

    @jimlloyd40 said:

    @marcwool1 said:
    I've seen that video before and I was alluding to it being useless because I'm not about to lug a tripod around, and people in general, but kids specifically, are not going to hold a pose for more than 1 second.

    One day, if I feel like taking a stationary photo of my table, that video might be helpful.

    For now I'm thinking I'll have to use my daughter's phone for pictures once it gets dark.

    Sorry I mentioned it.

    Ah, actually I appologise. Frustration got the better of me. A decent low-light camera is something you never figure you'll need and then it turns out you really need it.

    I ended up shooting pics simultaneously with my daughter's S7, and my Axon 7. The daylight and sunset photos, the Axon did a better job, but once night time kicked-in the S7 destroyed my Axon 7 for low-light with and without flash, photos.

    That is one of the limitations when using a higher resolution sensor, at low ISO, they can deliver on that extra resolution, and provide more detail, but since each pixel is smaller, they also capture less light.

    For example, if you have 2 sensors that ate 1/2.3 inches in size, and 1 sensor is 10 megapixels, and the other is 20 megapixels, the 10 megapixel sensor will capture twice as much light per pixel.

    This is largely why most smartphone cameras have stayed around 12 megapixels, you trade some resolution and detail in good lighting in order to have less noise in low lighting.

    Beyond that, you can better quality than the jpegs produced by the stock camera app would provide if you capture the raw files, and then process them in photoshop, lightroom or any other preferred image editor.

    For example, https://i.imgur.com/CsqrLne.jpg

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