ZMax Pro - Camera images are dark when camera is pointed towards light.

jesse1337jesse1337 Planet ZeekoisPosts: 6 ✭✭

How do you make it so the ZMax Pro can take pictures with out every thing going dark when it's pointed towards light? Attached are two examples, ZTE Zmax, which worked great, and then the Pro, which makes the image dark when pointed towards light.

Comments

  • razor512razor512 United States Posts: 2,620 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 24, 2017 9:08PM

    For those issues, you will need to tap on the underexposed part of the image.

    Be default you will often get something similar to center weighted metering that averages the collected values until you tap a specific part of the frame, at which point, it will perform some spot metering.

    If the camera app does face detection, then it usually should go into a partial metering style mode where you get what is effectively either center weighted average metering or matrix metering but with the measurement range limited to just the box around the face.

    If you get a chance, try tapping a specific part of the image to avoid having it expose for the light behind you.

    Auto metering will always have trouble with backlit subjects.
    Here is a good video delving into metering vs manual. These are issues that even expensive cameras have trouble with backlighting.

    Overall, for the camera, if it doesn't detect and place a box around your face, then it is relying on the built in metering that is effectively analyzing the entire frame and averaging it and then finding a shutter speed and ISO that will achieve a 50% gray, or it is biasing those values to focus more heavily on the center of the frame but still allowing other elements of the frame to impact the exposure, in both cases, a backlit subject will become underexposed.

    If it accurately detects the face, then it will either do center weighted metering for just the face, or matrix metering for just the face with a small bias towards the eyes.

    if you must shoot auto, and it did not detect a face, then tap on the face so that it can go into spot metering mode, and then more properly expose for the face.

  • jesse1337jesse1337 Planet ZeekoisPosts: 6 ✭✭

    you will need to tap on the underexposed part of the image.

    If the camera app does face detection, then it usually should go into a partial metering style mode where you get what is effectively either center weighted average metering or matrix metering but with the measurement range limited to just the box around the face.

    try tapping a specific part of the image to avoid having it expose for the light behind you.

    None of this does anything at all to get rid of the darkness. It's as if the light automatically makes it dark.

  • razor512razor512 United States Posts: 2,620 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭✭
    edited August 25, 2017 12:04AM

    If it is not offering spot metering, it may offer an exposure composition slider that you can drag up in order to increase the exposure (It may show up on the right side of the frame).

    If it lacks that function, then it may be using the older camera app. In which case, make sure that it is not placing a green box around the light source in the photo, if it does, then position the camera so that your head is blocking the light, as it may be doing a frame average within the green box, which can lead to an underexposed image if the light source falls within that green box.

  • jesse1337jesse1337 Planet ZeekoisPosts: 6 ✭✭

    How do you stop the camera images from being dark when doing a selfie, where you don't have all the settings to mess with?

  • coldheat06coldheat06 United States Posts: 1,746 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    @jesse1337 said:
    How do you stop the camera images from being dark when doing a selfie, where you don't have all the settings to mess with?

    Try have the light facing you instead of behind you.

  • jasonejasone United States Posts: 2,039 ✭✭✭✭✭✭✭✭

    Like others here have said you either tap on yourself on the screen to change the exposure, don't put the light behind you, or make sure you're blocking the light, or your face is taking up the majority of the space in the frame.

    In your first photo, your face is taking up much more of the frame of the photo which caused the camera to read you and try to expose for you. There is also a slider that appears sometimes when you tap on the screen where you want it to expose for that you can slide up and down to adjust brightness which was also mentioned.

    I see this happen a lot when on video calls because I have a window behind me. I have to make sure my face takes up the majority of the frame in order to get the proper exposure.

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